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Power Patents.
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     Power Patents™    
Powerful patents do not just evolve, they are built. We build Power Patents.
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Patent power and strength emerges from deliberate incorporation of formal and informal sources.
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Most patent preparation firms are only concerned with, or are only familiar with, formal sources of patent rights and protections. Unfortunately, too often many of these firms are too indifferent or unconcerned about deliberately building in patent strength, but simply draft patents as quickly as possible and let patent strength profile, rights, and protections somewhat arbitrarily fall where they may.
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Not at Fortress PATENTS / IP. A key focus in preparing a patent, trademark, and other intellectual property application or service is to incorporate as much power and strength elements as possible to deliberately maximize all available rights, protections, and market potential, while being the most affordable full service patent firm known.
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Suite of Patent and IP Power Strengtheners
We introduced on the home page this set of elements and available actions that Fortress PATENTS /IP now has available to tailor the greatest scope, strength, and strategy into a patent for maximum rights, protections,and market potential.
♦  12 point patent strengthening choices.
♦  Active and passive patent rights and protections.
♦  Custom patent choice matrix balancing patent strength profile with invention and situational circumstances.
♦  Avoiding patent scams, traps, and mishaps.
♦  Power Patents, Power Trademarks, and power other intellectual property understanding and methods.
♦  Capturing the inventive concept for broader scope, strength, and strategy.
♦  Methods for maximize invention patent rights, protections, and market potential.
♦  Faster, easier, safer, and least costly to deter with strength than defend.
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Power Foundation
Fortress PATENTS / IP upon your direction will apply any and all of the above mentioned elements to customize your Power Patent.
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Central to a powerful patent is first to ensure focus on the elements of the patent that most centrally contribute to patent strength as shown below. 
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Patent Power.
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Search – Where a search is important, the search is first to determines if there is space in the intellectual property landscape to justify patenting effort and expense. As such, a search has merit for any intellectual property effort. There are four usual type of searches:
No Search – Either the search is not as valued as shown above, or the inventor simply chooses not to conduct the search. Not conducting a search leaves some risk in investing in a patent without knowledge of a patentable pathway. 
Quick Search – This search provides knowledge of a patentable pathway through existing prior art and provides justification for patent investment.
Rational Search – Beyond “Quick Search” results of simply establishing a path forward, but putting in a rational amount of effort to identify virtually all most relevant competitive prior art. This approach accepts a willingness to gain patent rights in a fully competitive environment. I allows the patent to address needed issues up front, it justifies the patent with a type of full peer review challenge, and it avoids the patent being challenged or blindsided later. This creates the most powerful patent with the greatest deterrence power and defensive power available. If the patent is intended to be a serious protection of intellectual property then the Rational Search is imperative. 
Exhaustive Search – This search is often reserved for litigation to defend a patent or to invalidate a patent. The more time effort spent of the aforementioned Rational Search, the less necessary or impactful will be an Exhaustive Search, if there is ever a challenge to the patent.
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Description – A full and unabridge description is necessary, to include:
Context – Frame the invention by discussing the problem to be solved, why other solutions fall short, how the invention uniquely solves the problem, what primary and additional contexts or applications would benefit from the invention.  
Invention – Clearly and in detail describe the specific embodiment of the invention to achieve full disclosure to trigger all available active and passive rights and protections.
Inventive Concept – The patent needs to protect more than the invention, but must include protecting the inventive concept. The greatest value of the patent usually resides in protecting the broader inventive concept. It is the inventive concept that can commodate changes in the specific invention with changes in invention function, market preference, manufacturing methods, production costs, and more. Patenting the inventive concept is usually what provides for continued relevance of the patent over time. 
Definitions – A power section of Fortress PATENTS / IP patents is the definition section. This section further expands the breadth of the patent to create a greater degree of passive protection. This breadth in the description also increases patent prosecution freedom as the breadth of concepts included in this section can be drawn upon to justify rights being claimed and other prosecution offensive and defensive positions. The extent of this definition section is unique with Fortress PATENTS / IP.
Enabling – An important threshold to meet with the disclosure of the invention is that a person having ordinary skill in the art (not an expert) can mimic the invention without undue experiementation. When this threshold is met, then the disclosure become prior art to other inventors.
Best Mode – Part of qualifying for granted rights is that the disclosure must include the current best mode of the invention. It is not acceptable to disclose less than what is considered to be the best execution of the invention, or granted rights may be disqualified.
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Drawings – A sufficient set of drawings are needed to clarify the totality of the invention. Consider there to be five degrees of drawing specificity, not all applicable to each patent:
Design and Plant Patent Drawings – These are detailed drawings, even artistic drawings that focus on surface, aesthetic, and other visual elements of the subject. As many renderings and views of the invention should be included to ensure understanding of the invention.
Utility Drawings – A more outline oriented drawing focused on basic representations of functional elements with indicators to allow for explanation of each functional element. As many renderings and views of the invention should be included to ensure understanding of the invention.
Block Diagrams – Often used for more conceptual inventions, such as business methods, device applications, and other computer code, black box representations of a function without detail, etc. These are well accepted and frequently used. They are excellent shortcuts to drawings with form is not involved.
Flow Charts – Important to supporting statutory method claims to show the sequential or simultaneous process of a machine, manufactured item, chemical process, etc. If a method claim is involved in the patent, then a flow chart should be included to support that claim.
Cover / Marketing Drawings – The patent as an instrument has different meaning depending upon who is viewing and reading it. As business executives, marketers, non-intellectual property legal minds, etc. will be viewing the patent, then a cover image that is more artistic and provides context to the invention is helpful. The U.S. Patent Law does not allow for extensive context with its drawings, but this is referring to a drawing to the extent possible that plays to the emotion of the invention and license or sale. 
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Claims – Where claims are shown to be important, they become increasingly almost singularly important as the patent proceeds through the prosecution and issuance process. Consider four common distinctions among the claims:
Basic Independent Claims – 3 independent claims are included with the USPTO filing fee. As such, each invention should include at least these three basic independent claims. The independent claim sets the perimeter of what is being claimed and the more independent claims the strong the patent.
Basic Dependent Claims – 17 dependent claims are included in the USPTO filing fee. As such, each invention should include at least these 17 dependent claims. These claims are attached or dependent upon the independent claim. They do not extend the rights of the invention, but clarify those rights. They are important during the patent prosecution process as providing clearly defined fall back positions, but become increasingly less important as the prosecution proceeds and issuance occurs. 
Specialized Independent Claims – These are Apparatus, Method, or Composition statutory independent claims as discussed previously, but that are specifically designed to address protections against competitive inventions, competitors, market situations, or other specific needs of the invention and the current climate in which it resides now and into the future. This is where more independent claims arise, and the more independent claims the stronger the patent. 
Multiple Dependent Claims – These are basic dependent claims that directly depend upon another dependent claim rather than directly depend upon an independent claim. The use of the Multiple Dependent Claim is simply a tool among other in the claiming process.
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The full screen, full service, and full educational website www.FortressPATENTS.com further discusses each of the above foundational elements of the patent, for each type of patent, in greater detail.
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Power Patents emerge from a combination of a strong foundation of the patent application from the chosen search, a full enabling disclosure, clarifying drawings, and proper claiming. With a strong foundation, other strengthening elements can be incorporated to create the strength profile needed, the tailoring of the patent needed, and more. Fortress PATENTS / IP is unmatched in its ability to product powerful patents.
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Ultimately we are driven by the principle, it is less costly and safer for the intellectual property to deter patent infringement with patent power than to defend patent rights. In short, it is better to deter than to defend. See the full website at www.FortressPATENTS.com/Maintain-Rights-And-Protection and the Doctrine of Laches and Doctrine of Estoppel to understand this principle further.
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Larger Context Patent and IP Power Considerations
Other pages of this website focus on specific mechanism to create a Power Patent. Below is a broader perspective of considering the audience when building the patent to ensure the patent is not only legally sound, technically sound, but also understood by various audiences.
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Power Patents represent 10 deliberate actions in every patent by Fortress PATENTS / IP to impart the highest patent quality and maximum patent rights, protections, and potential.
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Law
Grasp all available legal rights.  Every appropriate and applicable right and advantage available in patent law will be applied.
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Tech
Captures the immediate invention and expanded Inventive Concepts.
Invention – The specific invention is often just one form with limited market duration of a greater inventive concept. Capturing the invention is critical, as it is the current “best mode” (a U.S. Patent Law imperative) and specific protections are needed for that embodiment.
Inventive Concept – As market preferences change, material or technological changes emerge, for manufacturing considerations, etc. the original invention often evolves. Also patenting the broader concepts allows for this evolution of the specific embodiment of the invention, retaining value in the patent for the duration of granted rights.
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Story
Consider that the legal requirement of the patent have been fulfilled. Consider that the technical requirements of the patent have been included. Then ask if your audience can understand it. A patent is a business asset, not just a legal document and technical spec sheet. However, these are not the totality of the audience that needs to appreciate the patent and protected invention.
Operations and Market Leadership – It is the executive, the marketer and sales person, the designer, etc. that must understand and execute the invention captured in the patent. This becomes particularly important if the patent is to be practices by a business division that did not innovate the invention or for a potential licensee or buyer of the patent.
Competitors and Potential Infringers – The patent may be legally and technically precise, but not understandable to others who are less informed about all aspects of the invention. Any confusion create potential non-infringing work-arounds or questionable risk with infringement. Clarity in a patent may be no more important that for competitors and potential infringers to understand clearly what the invention is and what rights are granted by the patent.
Court Judges and Juries – These are not usually innovators with all the skills and attributes associated with such. These are legal specialist and the general public. If the patent cannot tell a story such that it is understandable by the legal process then there is less likelihood that the patent can be judge to have the strengths it claims. The patent needs a story that speaks to the judge and jury.  
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Clarity
Document organization and content that allows for rapid reference and facilitates prosecution and understanding:
Required Section – The formal required sections of the patent application and ultimately the patent need to be utilized and clearly identified.
Definitions – Placing common elements and terms in a common locations allows for rapid reference, better ensures full detail treatment, improves prosecution outcomes, and unlocks a once powerful patent broadening tool that has diminished over the last years (see below). 
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Claims
Maximize independent claims as the most important element for patent strength.  Three independent claims are allow without additional USPTO fees.  Many patent firms fail to write three claims, and thereby severely limiting the power of the patent.  More than three claims can be used where warranted.
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Context
Minimized claim language and maximized description language broadens rights. Claims are for claiming and not explaining. Explaining in the claims and can severely limit rights and protections of the patent.  Explaining is acceptable and encouraged in the description and should be used to provide an antecedent to what is claimed. Within reason, the more patent description the more flexibility becomes inherent in the patent. 
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Custom
Tailor patent to specific market, licensing, competitor, and other imperative. A patent should not be drafted in a vacuum without consideration of its technical or business purpose as well as for those who will interact with it and place protective, technical, monetary, or judicial value upon it.
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ROI
Ensure innovation is attached to the greatest royalty or financial bearing entity. Whether an incremental advancement or product, the patent must ultimately tie the invention to a marketable product to which greater value can be ascribed. A method called “Maximum
Royalty Claiming.”
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Value
Quality combined with affordability creates unparalleled value. Undoubtedly a quality patent can be obtained with other patent firms and in all cases at substantially higher fees, and potentially less attention to the levers of patent power and strength, and possibly less comfortable experience.Fortress PATENTS / IP provide high patent quality with accessibility and affordability. 
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Leverage
Knowing levers that affect a patent and IP rights, leverages up revenues. Knowing from where and to what extent a patent, trademark or other intellectual property derives its power allows for taking prudent risks or in other cases licensing or selling the full potential of the patent.
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Fortress PATENTS / IP are not treat patents and other intellectual property casually or as simply a trivial legal document. Each patent, trademark, or other intellectual property is developed for maximum power in rights, protection, and potential while providing accessible and affordable service and experience.
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